Carbon Monoxide detector required by law in Colorado

Carbon Monoxide detector required by law in Colorado

After a series of tragic deaths in Colorado in late 2008 and early 2009, then-Governor Bill Ritter signed House Bill 09-1091 into law. Also known as the Lofgren and Johnson Families Carbon Monoxide Safety Act, this bill went into effect on July 1, 2009. It requires:

 

  • All single and multi-family RESIDENCES that have a fuel burning heater or appliance, a fireplace, or an attached garage that are sold, rented, remodeled, or repaired after July 1, 2009, must have a carbon monoxide detector.
  • If it is your personal residence or if it is used as a rental, it must have an operational carbon monoxide detector. 
  • New batteries must be provided to incoming tenants, and stolen units must be replaced. 
  • The detector must be installed within 15 feet to the entrance to any bedroom or other room lawfully used for sleeping.
  • There is no liability to homeowner or Realtor if the detector has been installed according to manufacturer’s suggestions.
  • The detector may either be a plug-in model or hard-wired.

If you would like more information, please contact Mimi Foster.

By Mimi Foster

About the Author

Mimi has received the honor of being voted one of Colorado Springs' Best Realtors five years in a row. With over two decades of experience, she is committed to making the home buying/selling process as easy and enjoyable as possible. Read Full Bio…

Helping buy and sell homes throughout Colorado Springs, Old Colorado City, Manitou Springs, and surrounding areas

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22 thoughts on “Carbon Monoxide detector required by law in Colorado”

  1. I am the maintenance supervisor for several apartment communities in Fort Collins. I have two questions. First, can the C.O. detector be battery operated only? Must a detector be replaced after a certain amount of time, such as six years?

    Reply
    • Hello, Joseph. Yes, the CO detector can be battery operated. The law stipulates that with each new tenant that moves in, the landlord is responsible for providing a working detector with new batteries. After that, you are not liable for replacing the batteries if they go out during that tenancy. There is nothing that stipulates when the unit itself must be replaced, only that it be in good working order when the tenant moves in.

      Reply
  2. Do the same rules apply for a condominium project? Is each unit required to have a carbon monoxide detector? Second, what if a rental property does not have one, can it be reported?

    Reply
    • Yes, each unit of a condominium project must have a carbon monoxide detector within 15 feet of any bedroom or legally used sleeping space. I don’t know what the penalties are, but yes, it can be reported.

      Reply
  3. Question: We are looking to purchase a property. The CO detector is in the hallway 3 feet from the entrance from 1 bedroom, 9 1/2 feet from the master bedroom, and 11 1/2 feet from the entrance to the third bedroom. Does this meed code?

    Reply
    • Yes, those described measurements meet code. As long as they are within 15 feet of any sleeping area, you’re set. Best of luck!

      Reply
    • Carbon Monoxide detectors should be replaced every five (5) years, smoke detectors should be replaced every ten (10) years.

      Reply
  4. Are rental houses required by law to have smoke detectors as well as CO detectors? What if the rental does not have them?

    Reply
    • No, Colorado does not have a law requiring smoke detectors. Some municipalities might, so you would have to check locally.

      Reply
  5. What if a 4plex is heated by a central boiler, with hot water pipes to each unit as a heat source. The boiler itself is in a separate room and not in a living space. All other appliances are electric. Does each unit still need a CO detector, even if heat is provided from hot water and the natural gas powered boiler is not in a living space?

    Reply
  6. I operate a small lodge/resort, am i required to have CO detectors within 15 feet of every legal sleeping area?

    Reply
  7. Can a CO detector be in the hallway with the bedroom door shut and still work adequately and meet the 15 feet requirement?

    Reply
  8. We just purchased a house, no CO detector on the property before or after sale.

    Any liability for the seller or realtor for there being no detector?

    Reply
    • That is not a requirement in the city of Colorado Springs, John. There just needs to be a detector within 15 feet of a sleeping space. Each municipality can make more stringent rules, but there is nothing that would indicate one being required in a mechanical room.

      Reply
  9. MY home was built in 2006 and had no Cos detectors. I have to have the central AC unit replaced I have been told that I have to install a Co2 detector. Why?

    Reply

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